Recent Articles

  • A recent story from CNN interviews Terry Crews, a famous actor and former NFL player, that was a sex addict who was consumed with watching pornography. He says that it “really, really messed up my life” and that it threatened his relationship with his wife and that it caused him to wall off his emotions to the point of destruction. Crews went to rehab for his addiction and has made a series of viral social media videos talking about his struggle with pornography, which has been refreshing and encouraging for millions of people that have struggled with the same thing. He says, "It changes the way you think about people. People become objects. People become body parts; they become things to be used rather than people to be loved." He goes on to say that his struggle was private for a long time and that his wife said that she hardly knew him anymore. He believes that everything you need for intimacy is found with your partner, not in porn. (1) 

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  • When you think about someone with high blood pressure, the image that first comes to mind is probably not a young teenager. But, more teens are becoming the victim of heart disease and high blood pressure because of the hours that they sit unmoving in front of the Internet and the arousal associated with video games stimulating the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. Researchers recently found that teens who spend at least 14 hours a week in front of the Internet have high blood pressure and they found that some teens used the internet excessively, for an average of 25 hours a week. These results also add to the growing research that links excessive internet use and other health struggles like depression, obesity, anxiety, social isolation, and addiction.  The study looked at more than 300 teens ages 14-17 who had their blood pressure taken. They also completed a 55 question survey on internet use, with the results showing 39% of girls were heavy internet users compared to 43% of boys. Researchers found that 43% of heavy internet users were considered overweight compared to 26% of light internet users. (1) 

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  • A shocking story out of India talks about two brothers that were so addicted to video games, that they stopped eating and using the bathroom because they were so immersed in their game. They would play for hours upon hours and it was reported that vandals broke in their home twice and they didn’t notice because they continued to play their game. Their parents recognized the problem and decided to admit them into a psychiatry ward to help rehabilitate them and get them back on track. They were reportedly there for over a month. "Many parents come to us with complaints of children spending excessive time surfing the internet. But this case was a shocker indeed. We had to admit them for over a month to reduce the craving for online games and prevent a relapse," Dr Ankur Sachdeva, the psychiatrist who treated them told The Times of India.  (1)

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  • We all know the Facebook trap: you open it up on your phone or laptop and you start scrolling. Before you know it, your eyes are glazing over and 20 minutes has gone by. When Facebook’s founder Mark Zuckerberg founded the site, he wanted to have everyone spend lots of time clicking around his website and now, 12 years later, it has changed the way we interact. In fact, social media as a whole has revolutionized communication as a whole. For many people, face to face interactions are secondary. The go-to communication tactic is direct messaging, texting, or posting messages on people’s Facebook pages. The time consumers spend on Facebook has become so excessive that according to the company’s 2012 IPO filings, users spend about 10.5 billion minutes a day (not counting on mobile apps) worldwide. That means people have spent about 55 million years on Facebook since 2009. If that’s not shocking enough, it’s estimated that this wasted time is costing about $3.5 trillion in wasted productivity.  In fact, if you spent those 20 minutes a day off of Facebook and working a minimum wage job, you could make a little over $800 that year. (1)  

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Video Game Addiction

Written by Dr. Andrew Doan & Brooke Strickland on .