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New Bill Could Ban Walking & Cell Phone Use

Written by Dr. Andrew Doan & Brooke Strickland on .

We’ve all seen it: people walking and talking on their cell phone or walking and texting. Chances are, we’ve done it too. We’re attached to our phones for most of the day, so using our phones while we walk is just commonplace. The danger is: total distraction and not paying attention to your surroundings. 

Distracted walking is no longer a joke. In fact, there has been an increase in pedestrian-related deaths and accidents because of this digital distraction. So much so, that a new bill has been proposed to ban the use of walking and cell phone use while crossing streets or highways. The bill has been introduced by Honolulu City Council member Brandon Elefante. The bill would also make it illegal for bicyclists to be on their phones while in a crosswalk. Hawaii has recently been listed as the 13th highest in pedestrian fatalities and the goal with this bill would be to help reduce this number. Lawmakers have already banned texting while driving in 46 states but so far, there are no fines for those who are walking, texting, and unaware of crossing busy streets or vehicles traveling close by. (1) (2) 

 

Have you put yourself in danger because of your digital addiction? Take steps to reduce your use. When you’re walking around town, keep your device in your pocket or purse at all times. Don’t be tempted to check it unless you stop to use it. Make a conscious effort to not let technology take over your mind and starting small is key. Manage technology so you are not oblivious to the world around you. It’s only beneficial if you can manage it. It’s detrimental if you let it manage you. 

For more information, visit realbattle.org/resources.

  1. Bill would ban cellphone use while crossing streets. KPTV.com. January 27, 2017. Accessed online January 28, 2017. http://www.kptv.com/story/34365560/bill-would-ban-cellphone-use-while-crossing-streets 
  2. Horn, Marissa. “Walking while texting can be deadly.” USA Today. March 8, 2016. Accessed online January 28, 2017 http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2016/03/08/pedestrian-fatalities-surge-10-percent/81483294/